Ajax Upload and Resize an Image with PHP.

Today I am presenting the most important social networking feature called ajax upload and resize an image without refreshing the page using jquery and PHP. This tutorial a continuation of my previous post, I just included image re-sizing function for different dimensions. It is very useful for your web project that saves lots of hosting space and bandwidth limit. Take a quick look at the live demo.

admin-ajax

The tutorial contains three folders called js,includes and uploads with PHP files.
includes
— getExtension.php
— compressImage.php
js
— jquery.min.js
— jquery.form.js
uploads
index.php
ajaximageupload.php
db.php

Javascript Code

$(“#photoimg”).live(‘change’,function(){})- photoimg is the ID name of INPUT FILE tag and $(‘#imageform’).ajaxForm() – imageform is the ID name of FORM. While changing INPUT it calls FORM submit without refreshing page using ajaxForm() method. Uploaded images will prepend inside #preview tag.

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/
ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.form.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() 
{ 

$('#photoimg').live('change', function() 
 {
var A=$("#imageloadstatus");
var B=$("#imageloadbutton");

$("#imageform").ajaxForm({target: '#preview', 
beforeSubmit:function(){
A.show();
B.hide();
}, 
success:function(){
A.hide();
B.show();
}, 
error:function(){
A.hide();
B.show();
} }).submit();
});

}); 
</script>

Here hiding and showing #imageloadstatus and #imageloadbutton based on form upload submit status.

index.php
Contains simple PHP and HTML code. Here $session_id=1 means user id session value. 

<?php
include('db.php');
session_start();
$session_id='1'; // User login session value
?>
<div id='preview'>
</div>
<form id="imageform" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data" action='ajaximage.php'>
Upload image: 
<div id='imageloadstatus' style='display:none'><img src="loader.gif" alt="Uploading...."/></div>
<div id='imageloadbutton'>
<input type="file" name="photoimg" id="photoimg" />

</div>
</form>

Sample database design for Users.

Users
Contains user details username, password, email and profile_image  etc.
CREATE TABLE `users` (
`uid` int(11) AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
`username` varchar(255) UNIQUE KEY,
`password` varchar(100),
`email` varchar(255) UNIQUE KEY,
`profile_image` varchar(200)
)

ajaximage.php

Contains PHP code. This script helps you to upload images into uploads folder. Image file name rename into timestamp+session_id.extention

<?php
include('db.php');
session_start();
$session_id='1'; // User session id
$path = "uploads/";

$valid_formats = array("jpg", "png", "gif", "bmp","jpeg","PNG","JPG","JPEG","GIF","BMP");
if(isset($_POST) and $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == "POST")
{
include_once 'includes/getExtension.php';
$imagename = $_FILES['photoimg']['name'];
$size = $_FILES['photoimg']['size'];
if(strlen($imagename))
{
$ext = strtolower(getExtension($imagename));
if(in_array($ext,$valid_formats))
{
if($size<(1024*1024)) // Image size max 1 MB
{
$actual_image_name = time().$session_id.".".$ext;
$uploadedfile = $_FILES['photoimg']['tmp_name'];

//Re-sizing image. 
include 'includes/compressImage.php';
$widthArray = array(200,100,50); //You can change dimension here.
foreach($widthArray as $newwidth)
{
$filename=compressImage($ext,$uploadedfile,$path,$actual_image_name,$newwidth);
echo "<img src='".$filename."' class='img'/>";
}

//Original Image
if(move_uploaded_file($uploadedfile, $path.$actual_image_name))
{
//Insert upload image files names into user_uploads table
mysqli_query($db,"UPDATE users SET profile_image='$actual_image_name' WHERE uid='$session_id';");
echo "<img src='uploads/".$actual_image_name."' class='preview'>";
}
else
echo "failed";
}
else
echo "Image file size max 1 MB"; 
}
else
echo "Invalid file format.."; 
}
else
echo "Please select image..!";
exit;
}
?>

compressImage.php
Re-sizing image into different pixel dimensions. 

<?php
function compressImage($ext,$uploadedfile,$path,$actual_image_name,$newwidth)
{

if($ext=="jpg" || $ext=="jpeg" )
{
$src = imagecreatefromjpeg($uploadedfile);
}
else if($ext=="png")
{
$src = imagecreatefrompng($uploadedfile);
}
else if($ext=="gif")
{
$src = imagecreatefromgif($uploadedfile);
}
else
{
$src = imagecreatefrombmp($uploadedfile);
}

list($width,$height)=getimagesize($uploadedfile);
$newheight=($height/$width)*$newwidth;
$tmp=imagecreatetruecolor($newwidth,$newheight);
imagecopyresampled($tmp,$src,0,0,0,0,$newwidth,$newheight,$width,$height);
$filename = $path.$newwidth.'_'.$actual_image_name; //PixelSize_TimeStamp.jpg
imagejpeg($tmp,$filename,100);
imagedestroy($tmp);
return $filename;
}
?>

getExtension.php
This extracts file extension. 

function getExtension($str)
{
$i = strrpos($str,".");
if (!$i)
{
return "";
}
$l = strlen($str) - $i;
$ext = substr($str,$i+1,$l);
return $ext;
}

db.php
Database configuration file, modify username, password and database values. 

<?php
define('DB_SERVER', 'localhost');
define('DB_USERNAME', 'username');
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'password');
define('DB_DATABASE', 'database');
$db = mysqli_connect(DB_SERVER,DB_USERNAME,DB_PASSWORD,DB_DATABASE);
?>

 

Auto Load and Refresh Div every 10 Seconds with jQuery

Have you seen this Twitter Search and Facebook shows most recent tweets/posts count from the database every 10 seconds on top of the page. I had developed like this with jQuery and Ajax. It’s simple just 5 lines of code

Example 1

Index.html
Contains javascript and HTML code. Take a look at load(“record_cound.php”)

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/
libs/jquery/1.3.0/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
var auto_refresh = setInterval(
function ()
{
$('#load_tweets').load('record_count.php').fadeIn("slow");
}, 10000); // refresh every 10000 milliseconds

<body>
<div id="load_tweets"> </div>
</body>

</script>

record_count.php
Just printing “9lessons | programming” every 10 seconds

<?php
echo "9lessons | Programming blog..............";
?>

Example 2

index.php
Contains PHP code you have to pass the search box value twitter.com/search?q=”some thing” to $search_word in facebook pass the user id or user session value.

 

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/
libs/jquery/1.3.0/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
var auto_refresh = setInterval(
function ()
{
$('#load_tweets').load('record_count.php?q=<?php echo $search_word; ?>').fadeIn("slow");
}, 10000); // refresh every 10000 milliseconds

<body>
<div id="load_tweets"> </div>
</body>

</script>

 

record_count.php
Counting tweets/posts from the database.

<?php
include("db.php");
$search_word=$_GET['q'];
$sql = mysqli_query($db,"Select id form Messages where message 
LIKE '%$search_word%'");
$record_count=mysqli_num_rows($sql);
//Display count.........
echo $record_count;
?>

db.php
Database configuration file, modify username, password and database values. 

<?php
define('DB_SERVER', 'localhost');
define('DB_USERNAME', 'username');
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'password');
define('DB_DATABASE', 'database');
$connection = mysqli_connect(DB_SERVER,DB_USERNAME,DB_PASSWORD,DB_DATABASE);
?>

 

 

Uber now delivers packages with Rush courier service

Not content with delivering people to their destination, Uber is now delivering packages as well.

The company rolled out a new service on Monday called Rush, which lets people order pickup and delivery of packages using the Uber app. It’s initially available only south of 110th Street in Manhattan, but Uber says it will expand that coverage quickly. If the service is successful, presumably it will bring it to other cities as well.

Packages are delivered by bike messenger or by foot, and users can select a pickup location in the app in much the same way they order a car today. Uber says a messenger will arrive within minutes. The user can then track the location of the package and share that location with the recipient.

It could be a smart move by Uber, whose car service is already popular among urban professionals—the same type of people who use courier services today. And it piggybacks on the GPS in phones, allowing people to see how far their package has gotten.

Uber is just getting started with the service, and it notes that messenger availability will be limited to start. It also can’t guarantee the accuracy of ETAs, and “tracking may pause if a messenger hops on the subway.”

Still, it marks a new direction for Uber and is the latest example of an essentially offline service being turned into an on-demand mobile app. Uber and its rivals, including Lyft and Sidecar, have already turned the taxi business on its head.

Uber had apparently planned to announce the service Tuesday but news started to leak out early, partly because of Uber’s not-so-subtle hints. “We’re rolling out some big news on Tuesday,” Uber said in a tweet Saturday posted to its New York City Twitter account, featuring a photo of a bicycle wheel.

It has also posted job ads on Craigslist to hire couriers. They’ll be paid $20 to $30 per hour, the ad says, and be given an iPhone 4S so they can receive delivery orders.

There are already apps that help people get daily chores done, such as Postmates, WunWun and TaskRabbit. Uber notes that, unlike some of those apps, its couriers will not purchase items for delivery.

Facebook app gives free Internet to mobile users in Zambia

Facebook introduced an app on Thursday that will give mobile phone subscribers in Zambia access to a set of free basic mobile data services—and Facebook.

The app is part of Facebook’s Internet.org project that aims to bring Internet access to the two thirds of the world’s population that doesn’t have it. With the app, people can browse a set of health, employment and local information services without data charges, Facebook said on Thursday.

“By providing free basic services via the app, we hope to bring more people online and help them discover valuable services they might not have otherwise,” Facebook’s director of product management, Guy Rosen , wrote.

Among the services are Google, Wikipedia and AccuWeather as well as Facebook and Facebook messages, a Zambia job search portal and a women’s rights app, Rosen said.

Airtel customers can access these services in the Internet.org Android app, at internet.org, or within the Facebook for Android app, he said. It will first be available to Airtel subscribers in Zambia and later roll out to partners in other parts of the world, he added.

Facebook has already done something similar in the Philippines where it partnered with service provider Globe to offer services for free. It also has partnered with carrier Tigo in Paraguay in the early stages of the Internet.org project. According to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg the number of Internet users doubled in the Philippines while Tigo saw the growth of Internet users rise by 50 percent as a result as a result of the tests.

Internet.org could generate revenue for operators through up-selling content. If someone clicks on a link on Facebook to something that isn’t included in the basic services, operators could offer a low-cost data plan which allows more bandwidth to use data-heavy services.

Over the next year, Facebook hopes to find three to five more partners to roll out some basic Internet services Zuckerberg said in February during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, adding that ultimately, Facebook hopes to bring some form of Internet access to at least 2 billion to 3 billion more people.

Why the Security of USB Is Fundamentally Broken

Computer users pass around USB sticks like silicon business cards. Although we know they often carry malware infections, we depend on antivirus scans and the occasional reformatting to keep our thumbdrives from becoming the carrier for the next digital epidemic. But the security problems with USB devices run deeper than you think: Their risk isn’t just in what they carry, it’s built into the core of how they work.

That’s the takeaway from findings security researchers Karsten Nohl and Jakob Lell plan to present next week, demonstrating a collection of proof-of-concept malicious software that highlights how the security of USB devices has long been fundamentally broken. The malware they created, called BadUSB, can be installed on a USB device to completely take over a PC, invisibly alter files installed from the memory stick, or even redirect the user’s internet traffic. Because BadUSB resides not in the flash memory storage of USB devices, but in the firmware that controls their basic functions, the attack code can remain hidden long after the contents of the device’s memory would appear to the average user to be deleted. And the two researchers say there’s no easy fix: The kind of compromise they’re demonstrating is nearly impossible to counter without banning the sharing of USB devices or filling your port with superglue.

“These problems can’t be patched,” says Nohl, who will join Lell in presenting the research at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas. “We’re exploiting the very way that USB is designed.”

‘IN THIS NEW WAY OF THINKING, YOU HAVE TO CONSIDER A USB INFECTED AND THROW IT AWAY AS SOON AS IT TOUCHES A NON-TRUSTED COMPUTER.’
Nohl and Lell, researchers for the security consultancy SR Labs, are hardly the first to point out that USB devices can store and spread malware. But the two hackers didn’t merely copy their own custom-coded infections into USB devices’ memory. They spent months reverse engineering the firmware that runs the basic communication functions of USB devices—the controller chips that allow the devices to communicate with a PC and let users move files on and off of them. Their central finding is that USB firmware, which exists in varying forms in all USB devices, can be reprogrammed to hide attack code. “You can give it to your IT security people, they scan it, delete some files, and give it back to you telling you it’s ‘clean,’” says Nohl. But unless the IT guy has the reverse engineering skills to find and analyze that firmware, “the cleaning process doesn’t even touch the files we’re talking about.”

The problem isn’t limited to thumb drives. All manner of USB devices from keyboards and mice to smartphones have firmware that can be reprogrammed—in addition to USB memory sticks, Nohl and Lell say they’ve also tested their attack on an Android handset plugged into a PC. And once a BadUSB-infected device is connected to a computer, Nohl and Lell describe a grab bag of evil tricks it can play. It can, for example, replace software being installed with with a corrupted or backdoored version. It can even impersonate a USB keyboard to suddenly start typing commands. “It can do whatever you can do with a keyboard, which is basically everything a computer does,” says Nohl.

The malware can silently hijack internet traffic too, changing a computer’s DNS settings to siphon traffic to any servers it pleases. Or if the code is planted on a phone or another device with an internet connection, it can act as a man-in-the-middle, secretly spying on communications as it relays them from the victim’s machine.

Most of us learned long ago not to run executable files from sketchy USB sticks. But old-fashioned USB hygiene can’t stop this newer flavor of infection: Even if users are aware of the potential for attacks, ensuring that their USB’s firmware hasn’t been tampered with is nearly impossible. The devices don’t have a restriction known as “code-signing,” a countermeasure that would make sure any new code added to the device has the unforgeable cryptographic signature of its manufacturer. There’s not even any trusted USB firmware to compare the code against.

The element of Nohl and Lell’s research that elevates it above the average theoretical threat is the notion that the infection can travel both from computer to USB and vice versa. Any time a USB stick is plugged into a computer, its firmware could be reprogrammed by malware on that PC, with no easy way for the USB device’s owner to detect it. And likewise, any USB device could silently infect a user’s computer. “It goes both ways,” Nohl says. “Nobody can trust anybody.”

But BadUSB’s ability to spread undetectably from USB to PC and back raises questions about whether it’s possible to use USB devices securely at all. “We’ve all known if that you give me access to your USB port, I can do bad things to your computer,” says University of Pennsylvania computer science professor Matt Blaze. “What this appears to demonstrate is that it’s also possible to go the other direction, which suggests the threat of compromised USB devices is a very serious practical problem.”

Blaze speculates that the USB attack may in fact already be common practice for the NSA. He points to a spying device known as Cottonmouth, revealed earlier this year in the leaks of Edward Snowden. The device, which hid in a USB peripheral plug, was advertised in a collection of NSA internal documents as surreptitiously installing malware on a target’s machine. The exact mechanism for that USB attack wasn’t described. “I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the things [Nohl and Lell] discovered are what we heard about in the NSA catalogue.”

THE ALTERNATIVE IS TO TREAT USB DEVICES LIKE HYPODERMIC NEEDLES.
Nohl says he and Lell reached out to a Taiwanese USB device maker, whom he declines to name, and warned the company about their BadUSB research. Over a series of emails, the company repeatedly denied that the attack was possible. When WIRED contacted the USB Implementers Forum, a nonprofit corporation that oversees the USB standard, spokeswoman Liz Nardozza responded in a statement. “Consumers should always ensure their devices are from a trusted source and that only trusted sources interact with their devices,” she wrote. “Consumers safeguard their personal belongings and the same effort should be applied to protect themselves when it comes to technology.

Nohl agrees: The short-term solution to BadUSB isn’t a technical patch so much as a fundamental change in how we use USB gadgets. To avoid the attack, all you have to do is not connect your USB device to computers you don’t own or don’t have good reason to trust—and don’t plug untrusted USB devices into your own computer. But Nohl admits that makes the convenient slices of storage we all carry in our pockets, among many other devices, significantly less useful. “In this new way of thinking, you can’t trust a USB just because its storage doesn’t contain a virus. Trust must come from the fact that no one malicious has ever touched it,” says Nohl. “You have to consider a USB infected and throw it away as soon as it touches a non-trusted computer. And that’s incompatible with how we use USB devices right now.”

The two researchers haven’t yet decided just which of their BadUSB device attacks they’ll release at Black Hat, if any. Nohl says he worries that the malicious firmware for USB sticks could quickly spread. On the other hand, he says users need to be aware of the risks. Some companies could change their USB policies, for instance, to only use a certain manufacturer’s USB devices and insist that the vendor implement code-signing protections on their gadgets.

Implementing that new security model will first require convincing device makers that the threat is real. The alternative, Nohl says, is to treat USB devices like hypodermic needles that can’t be shared among users—a model that sows suspicion and largely defeats the devices’ purpose. “Perhaps you remember once when you’ve connected some USB device to your computer from someone you don’t completely trust,” says Nohl. “That means you can’t trust your computer anymore. This is a threat on a layer that’s invisible. It’s a terrible kind of paranoia.”

Turn any surface into a touchscreen with TouchPico

Turn any surface into a touchscreen with TouchPico
There will be little need for carrying laptops and smartphones now, because TouchPico can convert any surface into a touchscreen.

Now print personalized news, emails using Little Printer
NEW DELHI: There will be little need for carrying laptops and smartphones now, because there is a device that can convert any surface into a touchscreen.

TouchPico, a new crowdfunding Indigogo project, is a compact Android PC with a built-in projector. Imagine playing Temple Run, but not within the confines of your phone’s screen, but on an 80-inch space. That, precisely, is what TouchPico does.

You can use the stylus that comes with TouchPico to touch and operate the apps on the projecOn the hardware side, TouchPico has a 1.6 GHz dual-core ARM Cortex A9 processor, 1GB of RAM and features a wireless mouse and audio output. The projector has a slot for HDMI input and also supports streaming. Users can expand the storage of the device via a memory card. Its lamp has a light output of at least 80 lumens. However, it is noteworthy, that it only works with Wi-Fi.

The funding campaign of TouchPico ends in August, and it will most likely be launched by October. The creators of the projector aim to raise $55 million through the crowdfunding project and have raised close to $100,000 till now. The device costs $499, but is currently available for $329 for a limited period.
ted surface.

The projector runs Android 4.0 and has access to all Google Play apps. Therefore, you can open your favourite apps to read a book, watch a movie, surf the web – all on an 80-inch screen. And not just for entertainment, this projector can also be used for professional work like giving presentations or drawing interactive tables; it can also prove to be instrumental for students and teachers alike in the classroom.

source:Times of india

Lenovo Announces Android 4.4 KitKat Updates for 6 Mid-Range Smartphones

Lenovo has announced that it will soon be releasing the Android 4.4 KitKat update for several of its recently launched mid-range smartphones, specifically 5 of its S series smartphones – S930, S650, S820, S920, S660 – and the P780.

The Chinese electronics giant announced that Android 4.4. KitKat updates for the six recently announced mid-range smartphones will be made available in a phased manner starting from this week ending with the roll-out of the S660’s update in September. Notably, Lenovo recommends users back up their data before updating their phones from Android 4.4 KitKat.

Lenovo further said that the update for the six smartphones will bring the UI available in its Vibe series of smartphones, along with the Lenovo ‘Premium DOit’ apps. The UI will according to the company get a ‘simple clutter-free look’ and a ‘user-friendly incoming call interface’. Also new, is enhanced notification access, an updated theme centre, an automatic profile changer, expanded accessibility APIs, the face orientation rotation feature, the smart call feature, the smart swipe feature, the new pocket and parental mode, as well as the smart dialler.

Describing three of the most popular the Premium DOit apps, Lenovo says SECUREit will help users track, analyse and optimise their data usage; the SHAREit app provides the fast phone-to-phone data transfer capability without the need for Wi-Fi or mobile network; and SYNCit will let users to have a permanent backup of all their data and whilst making it accessible on any device.

Elaborating on the changes the Android 4.4 KitKat update will bring, Lenovo added improved application compatibility, security enhancements, as well as bug fixes. Also new is an update to the Lenovo power manager, delivering improved battery utilisation. The camera apps have also been improved, for more efficient autofocus and white balance capabilities.

Commenting on the announcement, Sudhin Mathur, Director- Smartphone, Lenovo India, said, “After rolling out updates for Vibe Z, Vibe X and S860 last month, we are now bringing Android 4.4 to six of our mid-range smartphones at various price points. These updates are poised to take the user experience of these phone to a different level. In the last two years in India, we have grown leaps and bounds launching over 18 smartphones, each addressing specific user requirement, and we aim to continue this growth trajectory with newer models and iterations.”

Leatherdos hair clip doubles as a multitool

It’s a spy movie cliché. The hero takes a bobby pin from the heroine’s hair, and uses it to pick the lock on their handcuffs. Well, if she were wearing the new Leatherdos multitool hair clip, he’d also be able to do things like cutting through ropes, removing screws and, uh … unlocking a grocery card.

leatherdos-2   leatherdos-4

The Leatherdos was created on a lark by Israeli designer Yaacov Goldberg. Although most people might assume it’s purely intended as a women’s product, it was actually first conceived as a means of fastening Jewish mens’ yarmulkes to their hair.

leatherdos-10

The stainless steel clip features three sizes of screwdriver blades, along with a serrated cutting edge, a ruler, an 8-mm wrench, and an end that can take the place of a coin in a grocery cart’s locking receptacle.

It’s available now, for US$9. If you want to be even more ready-for-anything-at-all-times, you might also want to check out the Titanium Utility Ring.

Ferrari designer unveils plans for luxury Japanese Cruise Train

cruisetrain-4cruisetrain-5Following the success of its Seven Stars Cruise Train, which launched late last year, Japanese railway company JR East has announced plans to create another luxury sleeper train. The exclusive hotel on the move will be designed by renowned Ferrari designer Ken Okuyama, who was behind the Enzo Ferrari and Ferrari P4/5 designs.

Set to start construction in 2016, the Cruise Train will cost approximately ¥5 billion (US$50 million) to complete and will accommodate a maximum of 34 passengers in its 10 carriages. The design features a series of private guest suites, glass-walled observation cars, up-market restaurant, lounge and bar carriages, all complete with high quality furniture and fittings so passengers can sit back and take in the changing landscape.

One of the Cruise Train’s most notable draw cards is undoubtedly its lounge car situated at the rear of the train. Surrounded in floor-to-ceiling glass panels and stretching into the roof-line, the impressive carriage offers guests the chance to sit back and relax on a central island-style sofa while enjoying panoramic views.

Pricing details are yet to be released, but if the Cruise Train is anything like its sister the Seven Stars, guests will be looking at spending approximately US$1,500 per person for a two-day package. Able to run on both electric and non-electric rails, the Cruise Train is expected to hit the rails of a yet to be decided route in the Japanese spring of 2017.

Genie is claimed to use less power than other smart locks

Smart locks are becoming increasingly popular, with examples currently including the Lockitron and the Schlage Camelot Touchscreen Deadbolt. Many of the devices, however, go through batteries pretty quickly. It’s with this in mind that the creators of the Genie Smart Lock set out to design a device with the features of other models, but much less power drain.

geniesmartlock-0      geniesmartlock-1    geniesmartlock-2

Like most of the smart locks out there, Genie allows users to unlock their door with the help of a smartphone. It uses both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to accomplish this, which gives buyers the option of unlocking their door from anywhere their phone has an internet connection, or by just walking up to the door with their phone or Bluetooth fob close at hand. They can also grant temporary door-unlocking privileges to other people, such as house guests or maid services.

The main selling point of this particular lock, however, is the battery life. Most smart locks average about a month of use per charge, but the Genie promises up to 12 months of life. This is done using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). The lock itself only sends out BLE signals, and the Genie Hub, a Wi-Fi-connected device that is part of the system, receives those signals and sends them to the user’s smartphone through Wi-Fi. This means the lock itself is never actually connected to and searching for a wireless internet signal, thus keeping power consumption very low.

For users who are not interested in the Wi-Fi features, the lock can be used with just the BLE connectivity without the Genie Hub. Of course, users who go this way will be missing out on all of the remote unlocking features, but having options is always a good thing.

As with all smart locks, should the battery die at some point, a traditional key is also included for emergency unlocking. Also, another important thing to note is that the lock is designed to work with standard 54-mm door holes, and can be replaced with a traditional lock without leaving a trace – a feature renters will find useful.

The creators of the Genie Smart Lock are taking pre-orders right now. They are offering a few packages, but the main one is US$249 and includes the lock, the hub, two traditional keys, one Bluetooth fob, and two Bluetooth eKeys. They also have a slightly more expensive package that includes unlimited Bluetooth eKeys that can be sent to others for $329.

 

Source: Gaine